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Is the WNBA marketing the league as well as they are Caitlin Clark?


WNBA

Photo: @DrumlineAV


You might be thinking, "This guy's crazy, what's he talking about?" But hear me out for a second. If you take a step back and look at where the WNBA has gone since Caitlin Clark joined, you'll notice significant changes. I'm referring not only to the league as a whole but also to its presence on social media. The topic of race has become a significant point of conversation, not only among fans but also among current WNBA players.

If you're a true basketball fan, especially of women's basketball, you can't deny Clark's greatness. However, it's also clear that she has been placed on a professional pedestal that she hasn't fully earned yet.


WNBA

Photo: @DrumlineAV


Conversely, the argument that Clark could be the worst thing to happen to the WNBA hinges on several potential pitfalls. One concern is the immense pressure and expectations placed on her shoulders. I believe Caitlin will adapt and thrive as she grows within the league. But the real issue lies with the WNBA itself. The league's intense focus on promoting one player is overshadowing what could be the best season in WNBA history.

Are records being broken because of Clark? Absolutely. The statistics are undeniable. But when players like the great A'ja Wilson speak out about race, because of another player, it becomes clear that the league isn’t doing its job properly. Some might attribute this to white privilege; I see it as poor marketing from a league that has historically struggled to promote its superstars and its brand effectively.


WNBA

Photo: @DrumlineAV


Consider the talents of players like Camilla Cordoso, Angel Reese, Cameron Brink, Rickea Jackson, and Kate Martin. Yes I had to throw an Ace in there. The league has an abundance of amazing veterans and emerging stars, yet it seems solely focused on promoting one player. This narrow focus stifles the league's growth and fuels negativity surrounding Caitlin Clark.


WNBA

Photo: @DrumlineAV


Diana Taurasi, a veteran with unparalleled experience, pointed this out, and it was unfair for people to label her a hater. Taurasi’s comments were based on her deep understanding of the game. Her critique was about setting realistic expectations and recognizing that greatness in college doesn’t automatically translate to immediate dominance in the WNBA.


It’s also important to address the premature accolades. Clark has been hailed as one of the greatest before proving herself in the professional league. While her college career was remarkable, the WNBA is a different level, and success here requires time and adjustment.


In conclusion, we need to be honest in our assessments. Acknowledging a player’s struggles and the team’s performance without them isn’t about disrespect. It’s about setting realistic expectations and recognizing that growth takes time. She has the potential to be great, but we should allow her the space to develop and prove herself in the WNBA. The league shouldn’t use her solely to promote it, it’s time to start spreading the love, before you lose it.



Make sure to follow my work on all social medias, X @Jose_Volonte @Str8BetSports - IG @Straight_Bet_Sports and for any questions email straightbetsports@outlook.com

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